Monday, August 7, 2017

The day my startup died

I swore to myself that I’d never forget where I came from. An entrepreneur’s life is the hardest because it’s the most lonely. You can’t share your fears with anyone. Your family will not want to see you suffer, so the moment you tell them, they’ll ask you to find a job. Your friends, who are salaried professionals, will never understand how it feels to watch your bank balance go in the wrong direction, while worrying about paying your team’s salaries. Your other entrepreneur buddies have problems of their own and understandably don’t have the time to really listen.
I swore that I would listen to my founders’ fears, to their problems, to their loneliness.
As I write this, I can see startups begin to fold because of a lack of funds. I couldn’t bring myself to write about that day simply because I didn’t want to relive the pain. My fingers have trembled throughout this post because thinking about it felt like picking at an old and deep scar.
I write it only because even if just one founder who’s in a similar predicament feels a little less alone, it’ll be worth it.
It’s easy to glorify failure in this ecosystem, but the realities hold no glory. Only a wrenching, twisting pain that never really goes away. But it does dim, little by little, over the course of time. To that founder who can’t go on any longer, I offer these words from Noel Gallagher:
Hold up, Hold on
Don’t be scared
You’ll never change what’s been and gone
May your smile
Shine on
Don’t be scared
Your destiny may keep you warm
Cos all of the stars, are fading away
Just try not to worry
You’ll see them some day
Take what you need
And be on your way
And stop crying your heart out
Source : medium

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